SAFE in Sag Harbor Action Plan 2018

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DFC (“Drug Free Communities”) Goal One: Increase community collaboration

 

Objective 1: Increase by 10% the number of Coalition Members by 09/29/2018, compared to baseline, as evidenced by the Coalition Membership Roster.

Strategy 1: Communicate with faith-based organizations, parents, school, business, law enforcement, and criminal justice to increase collaboration and attract coalition membership.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Present information on the Coalition mission through FIVE (5) presentations to community groups, organizations, and agencies.

Project Coordinator

Members

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Improve Coalition infrastructure and policy to promote greater community engagement and participation, such as scheduling both daytime and evening meetings to accommodate members with different schedules.

Project Coordinator

Executive Committee, Members

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Increase community knowledge and understanding of the issues through presentations at community meetings, media events, and publicizing the Coalition’s work, thereby raising broader community interest in coalition membership

Project Coordinator, Sectors

Complete all by 9/26/2018

 

 

Objective 2: Increase by 5% the diversity of the Coalition Membership by 09/29/2018, as compared to baseline, as evidenced by the Coalition Membership Roster.

Strategy 1: Diversify Coalition membership to be more representative of the various sectors of the community.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Participate in ONE (1) multicultural event to foster relationships and recruit new members.

Project Coordinator membership, Other Org

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Conduct a Coalition Cultural Competence Audit

Board Leadership, Other Org, Project Coordinator

Complete by 11/30.2018

Reach out to underrepresented populations through regular communication channels and attending events/meetings of cultural groups.

Project Coordinator, Other Org, Media, Religious sector

Complete all by 03/29/2018

 

 

Objective 3: Increase by 10% the satisfaction of the Coalition Members: 90% of Coalition members will report satisfaction with their Coalition membership as measured by a Membership Satisfaction Survey by 09/29/2018.

Strategy 1: Establish clearly defined roles/responsibilities for members and opportunities for members to have ownership in Coalition work utilizing the following activities:

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Conduct Coalition Member Interest Inventory to identify member interests, skills, and abilities.

Project Coordinator, Chair, Sectors, Evaluator

5/30//2018

Facilitate monthly, quarterly and as needed meetings with ongoing communication, and participation in events and strategies.

ALL 12 Sectors, Coalition Chair,

Monthly through 9/29/2018

 

 

Objective 4: Increase by 10% the participation of the Coalition Members: The Coalition will secure active participation from 70% of its members by 09/29/2018 as compared to baseline of 60% as measured by coalition meeting attendance forms.

Strategy 1: Assess results of membership enrollment and participation and encourage and facilitate membership enrollment and active participation in Coalition activities.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Continue to attract and engage new and existing members to build leadership, active participation, and resources and support.

ALL Sectors,  Evaluator

Monthly, 9/29/2018

Continue to increase sector support (diverse populations, elected officials, businesses and faith community).

ALL Sectors, Sub-Committees

Complete by 09/29/2018

Ensure all sector members are involved in committee work relevant to their area of interest and expertise.

ALL 12 Sectors, Chairperson

Monthly 9/29/2018

 

 

Objective 5: Increase the knowledge of the Coalition Members:  Increase by 10% the knowledge and understanding of members concerning advocacy and social monitoring of environmental risk factors as evidenced by an increase in participation in Coalition events and advocacy efforts by 9/29/2018 and measured by Event sign in sheets.

Strategy 1: Increase Coalition partnerships and the capacity of Coalition partners to recognize environmental risk factors and respond accordingly.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Provide FIVE (5) trainings to members and stakeholders on environmental prevention topics and to build leadership skills.

Project Coordinator Sectors, Executive committee

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Educate members and stakeholders about events or incidents in the community that may encourage negative and positive behavior among youth and how to respond as necessary.

Project Coordinator, 12 Sectors,

Ongoing, 09/29/2018

Repeat the Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment

Project Coordinator, Sectors, Evaluator

Complete 03/31/2018

Disseminate results of Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment at a community event

Project Coordinator, Sectors, Evaluator

Complete 09/29/2018

 

DFC Goal Two: Reduce youth substance use.

 

Objective 1: By 9/29/18 reduce alcohol sales to minors aged 12-18 by 10% by reducing adolescent access to alcohol through policy change initiatives, as evidenced/measured by compliance checks conducted by local law enforcement.

Strategy 1: Educate local alcohol permit holders. 

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Conduct environmental scan of store signage to ensure appropriate advertising and product placement.

ALL Sectors, Project Coordinator, Chamber of Commerce

1/31/2018

Partner with licensees to ensure appropriate ID checks and secure their commitment to reduce underage drinking.

Project Coordinator, Business, Law Enforcement

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Collaborate with local Police Departments in conducting quarterly alcohol retailer compliance checks and publicly recognizing compliant vendors. 

Law Enforcement, Alcohol Control, Youth, Coalition membership

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Provide recognition of the results of the compliance checks of retailers and vendors in newspaper and other media

Project Coordinator, Media, Chamber of Commerce

Complete all by 09/29/2018

 

Strategy 2: Advocate for changes in law enforcement and court policies and practices related to alcohol use violations.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Increase awareness of Social Host ordinance and promote stronger local enforcement by law enforcement.

Media, Youth, Law Enforcement

Complete all by 09/29/2018

 

Strategy 3:  Decrease access to alcohol by Sag Harbor youth at public events.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Request all festival organizers complete a self-audit of best practices on alcohol sales and service

Members

4/31/2018

Target one of the annual outdoor events where alcohol is openly served

Members

4/31/2018

Identify event sponsors and alcohol vendors

Project Coordinator and Business Sector

6/30/2018

Meet with vendors and provide resources (signage, ID checkers, etc.)

Project Coordinator and Business Sector

6/30/2018

Work with local government to require vendor training and designated alcohol areas at outdoor events as part of the permitting process

Project Coordinator  12 Sectors

10/31/20188

 

 

 

Objective 2:  By 9/29/18 reduce cigarette sales and vaping paraphernalia to minors under the age of 21 by 10% by reducing adolescent access to such through policy change initiatives, as measured by compliance checks conducted by the Suffolk County Department of Health and/or local police departments.

Strategy 1: Educate local tobacco vendors.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Conduct environmental scan of store signage to ensure appropriate advertising and product placement including “vaping” products

All sectors, Project Coordinator, Chamber of Commerce

7/31/2018

Partner with vendors to ensure appropriate ID checks and secure their commitment to reducing tobacco use, including vaping

Project Coordinator, Business Sector, Law Enforcement, Health Dept.

Complete all by 7/31/18

Provide recognition and celebration of compliant vendors in newspaper and other media

Project Coordinator, Media, Business , Youth

Complete all by 8/31/2018

 

Strategy 2: Educate parents about common methods youth use to obtain e-cigarettes and vaping.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Conduct Parent workshops on current trends in e-cigarette and vaping use among youth

Project Coordinator, Training Consultant, sectors

Complete all by 9/29/2018

Make information available through school, media and internet about e-cigarette and vaping use trends and how youth are obtaining e-cigarettes and vaping

Project Coordinator, Social Media Coordinator

Complete all by 9/29/2018

 

 

Objective 3: By 9/29/18, increase by 10% the number of public awareness campaigns regarding effective alcohol and tobacco abuse prevention, as measured by the number of community events, trainings, and media reports in the catchment area.

Strategy 1: Coordinate school and community based campaigns promoting anti-drug messaging to change the perception of normative behaviors.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Plan and host Red Ribbon Week Events emphasizing alcohol abuse and tobacco prevention, coordinated with retailers, schools, law enforcement, student groups, and others.

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media, Law Enforcement, Business, Education

Complete all by 10/31/2018

Plan, Promote, and Implement a Parents Who Host Lose the Most campaign targeting social host consequences and youth alcohol abuse.

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media

Complete all by 5/31/2018

Implement PSA Campaign educating the public about issues related to youth alcohol abuse.

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media Retailers

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Implement the “Sticker Shock” campaign focused on youth alcohol abuse prevention, in coordination with local vendors, youth, and law enforcement

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media, Retailers

Complete all by 09/29/2018

 

Objective 4: By 9/29/18, increase by 10% the number of public awareness campaigns regarding effective marijuana use prevention, as measured by the number of community events, trainings, and media reports in the catchment area.

Strategy 1: Coordinate school and community based campaigns promoting anti-drug messaging to change the perception of normative behaviors

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Plan and host Red Ribbon Week Events emphasizing marijuana use prevention, coordinated with schools, law enforcement, student groups, and others.

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media, Law Enforcement, Business

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Implement PSA Campaign educating the public about issues related to youth marijuana abuse.

Project Coordinator, Youth, Media Retailers

Complete all by 09/29/2018

 

Objective 5: By 9/29/18, promote awareness and education on the effect of substance use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, Rx drugs) to the community and schools as measured by a 10% increase of attendees at trainings, seminars, town hall meetings.

Strategy 1: Provide trainings and technical assistance on alcohol to teachers, parents and professionals that work with youth.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Identify training needs among youth-serving professionals and parents

ALL Sectors, Project Coordinator, Youth

Complete all by 12/31/2017

Provide three (3) trainings throughout the year on reducing youth alcohol use

Project Coordinator, Youth, Parent, School

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Disseminate training materials and information pertaining to prevention and alcohol use via mail, e-mail, and the Coalition website.

Project Coordinator, Media, and volunteers

Complete all by 09/29/2018

 

 

Objective 6: By 9/29/18, increase youth mobilization and advocacy by 10% as measured by Coalition Membership Attendance Records noting the attendance of youth at the activities listed.

Strategy 1: Train youth groups and peer educators to advocate for change on their campuses and among their peers.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Train youth on the issues relating to underage drinking, risks of harm related to marijuana, tobacco and e-cigarette use.

Project Coordinator, Youth

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Engage youth to become advocates for a safe, healthy, and drug-free community.

Youth, Parents, Project Coordinator

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Present educational program at school boards, schools, businesses, and other community events.

Youth, Project Coordinator

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Provide information about social host laws on web sites, town hall meeting, school meetings, PTA meetings, student athletics, rotary club, religious orgs.

Youth, Project Coordinator

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Partner youth membership with the Tobacco Action Coalition, coordinated by the Suffolk County Health Department

Project Coordinator, Youth

Complete all by 9/29/2018

 

 

Strategy 2: Encourage School Districts’ to implement district-wide policy changes.

 

Activity

Who is responsible?

By when?

Recruit youth advocates and teacher sponsors

Project Coordinator, Youth, schools

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Train youth as advocates for policy change to attend school based meetings

Youth, Parents, Project Coordinator, Schools

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Attend School Board Meetings and advocate for policy change, participate in School Policy Committee meetings

Youth, Project Coordinator, Schools

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Encourage Coalition Membership involvement with School Board officials.

Youth, Project Coordinator, Schools

Complete all by 09/29/2018

Encourage School District and Board to include e-cigarette and vaping provisions in their substance use policies

Project Coordinator, Youth, Schools

Complete all by 9/29/2018

 

 

Take The Pledge

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3 Reasons To Take Part In Red Ribbon Week

School hallways across the U.S. will be adorned with Red Ribbons throughout the week, starting on Monday, October 23. That's because they are participating in the Red Ribbon Campaign, organized by the National Family Partnership, the oldest and largest drug prevention program in the nation. It's a week set aside for everyone in the community to come together toward a common goal:  create a drug-free America. The red ribbon symbolizesintolerance towards the use of drugs. 

Sag Harbor schools and those in many of the surrounding communities will work with students--and their families--to provide workshops and training in making healthy lifestyle choices. 

So why should you be a part of Red Ribbon Week?

1. Note the name of the sponsor: the National Family Partnership. Family. Partnership. Working together is key. 

2. The Red Ribbon Campaign is designed to get people talking, and that includes parents talking to their kids about the risks of drug use. If not now, when?

3. A main point of the campaign is mass participation. The more people who hear the message, the easier it is to promote positive change. 

What are you waiting for? Take the pledge

It's A Red Ribbon Week!

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SAFE in Sag Harbor and the Sag Harbor School District invite the community to take a visible stand against drugs by celebrating Red Ribbon Week from October 23-31, 2017. 

Red Ribbon Week raises awareness of drug use and the problems related to drugs facing our community, and encourages parents, educators, business owners, and other community organizations to promote drug-free lifestyles.

Pierson Middle/High School has many wellness related activities and events planned for the week including two motivational speakers. On October 25, Dan Occhiogrosso will speak to students in seventh and eight grade about making the hard choices, and living for something bigger than yourself.  On October 26, Matt Bellace, comedian and psychologist, will speak to parents and the community about natural highs and making a difference with your peers. He will also talk with middle school students the next day. The Middle School will cap the week off with a dodgeball tournament. 

“Red Ribbon Week encourages our entire community to adopt healthy, drug-free lifestyles,” said Danielle Laibowitz, project coordinater for SAFE in Sag Harbor. “The campaign brings together parents, schools, and businesses as we look for innovative ways to keep kids and communities drug free.”

SAFE continues to work with community leaders to engage our community to reduce alcohol and other drug use by our youth and to encourage healthy alternative choices. We are always looking for community members to join us. If you want more information or want to get involved, please contact Danielle Laibowitz, Project Coordinator for SAFE in Sag Harbor at coordinator@safeinsagharbor.org

Back To School: How To Help Your Teen Manage Stress

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For parents, back-to-school time is something of a relief, but for kids it’s often the return of stress and anxiety that was held at bay during the fun of summer. It’s normal for teens to experience a certain level of stress when returning to school‑adolescence is in and of itself a stressful time‑but as the pressure from parents, peers and themselves builds it can sometimes become unhealthy. 

The key here is to understand the difference between normal stress and when it becomes an issue of concern. 

According to the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids (https://drugfree.org/parent-blog/school-stress-healthy-stress-vs-red-flag-stress), while stress can be helpful and push a teen to perform better, it is “critical, though, that teens undergoing stress have the ability to function well at school and home.” 

Red flags to look for, according to drugfree.org, are:

  1. Changes in eating habits
  2. Difficulty falling sleep or staying asleep
  3. Significant mood changes, including depression, anxiety, panic or anger. 
  4. Demonstrating violent behaviors
  5. Using alcohol, marijuana or prescription drugs to deal with stress. 

Parents can help their teens manage stress. The key is being available to provide support when needed. When stress becomes too much for your teen to manage, seek mental health counseling or other support services. 

Kym Laube is the program director of SAFE in Sag Harbor, a community-based organization dedicated to creating a substance-abuse-free environment in Sag Harbor, safeinsagharbor.org

Parents: Four Ways To Build Your Child's Self-Esteem

Good choices flow from healthy self-esteem. Children who feel good about themselves know they are valued, feel confident, and feel ready to take on everyday challenges. One of those challenges could be making the right choice between engaging in a risky behavior or not.

Conversely, a child with low self-esteem lacks confidence, feel insecure and, as a result, be easily influenced by peers to use a “quick fix” purported to make them feel better about themselves.

SAFE in Sag Harbor is there to help our children make the right choices and avoid influences that may put them at risk. Part of that is building healthy self-esteem. As I travel locally and across the nation giving presentations on making good choices, the biggest challenge young people express is the struggle to feel confident and strong. They feel constant pressure from so many sources.

A 2006 study titled “Low Self-Esteem During Adolescence Predicts Poor Health, Criminal Behavior, and Limited Economic Prospects During Adulthood,” noted that it has been “theorized that children and adolescents with low self-esteem seek out various forms of antisocial behavior as a way of enhancing their self worth.” Moreover, the study noted that “low self-esteem children and adolescents may also receive less attention and support from parents, teachers and peers. For example, a low self-esteem child may appear quiet and withdrawn and may not be willing or able to ask a teacher for help with needed.”

http://208.112.107.53/sites/default/files/TRZESNIEWSKI_2006_AJP.pdf

So where does positive self-esteem come from? It comes from positive experiences that help a child feel capable, effective and accepted (http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/self-esteem.html#). It is not the result of praise for every action but rather learning from mistakes and understanding that hard work and practice pay off.

Four ways you can help your child develop positive self-esteem are:

1.    When teaching how to do things, show and help your child at first, but then allow mistakes. Don’t make new challenges too easy (or difficult).

2.   Use praise but avoid too much. Praise effort rather than the result.

3.   Avoid harsh criticism and focus on strengths.

4.   Be a good role model. Yes, it always comes back to this.

Kym Laube is the program director of SAFE in Sag Harbor, a community-based organization dedicated to creating a substance-abuse-free environment in Sag Harbor, safeinsagharbor.org

 

Parents: Three Clues Your Child Is Using Drugs

Trust is key in parenting. Every parent wants to believe that when asked a direct question, the answer they get is the truth. Unfortunately, that’s not always so, especially when a child heads down the road of risky behavior. 

As part of its mission, SAFE in Sag Harbor is there to help parents navigate these troubled waters and increase awareness of the issue within the community.

Determining whether your child is using drugs can be challenging. In its article “Look for Warning Signs,” the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids notes “many of the signs and symptoms are, at times, typical teen or young adult behavior. Many are also symptoms of mental health issues, including depression or anxiety disorders.”

http://drugfree.org/article/look-for-warning-signs/

Familiarizing yourself with some of the commons signs of drug use is a good start. Whether those signs lead to other issues that need to be addressed or offer evidence (or not) of drug use, it’s important that parents “trust their gut.”

http://drugfree.org/article/spotting-drug-use/ 

In our experience, among the top three warning signs of drug use are:

1.     Withdrawal from activities or people

2.     Money missing from your wallet

3.     Mood swings

If your child shows any of these signs, it’s time for a conversation. Be prepared for it before the conversation starts. For more warning signs, read here:

https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/signs-and-symptoms/what-to-look-for-signs-and-symptoms

Kym Laube is the program director of SAFE in Sag Harbor, a community-based organization dedicated to creating a substance-abuse-free environment in Sag Harbor, safeinsagharbor.org

Parents: Three Ways To Raise A Drug-Free Child

Welcome to our very first monthly blog ... 

Sag Harbor teens out party the nation’s teens when it comes to drugs and alcohol. Parents can, and should, be part of the solution to this pressing problem in our community.

SAFE in Sag Harbor was established to combat the increasing incidence of risky behavior among Sag Harbor teenagers, and increase awareness of the issue within the larger community.

In its “Preventing Drug Use Among Children and Adolescents, A Research-Based Guide for Parents, Educators and Community Leaders,” The National Institute on Drug Abuse” notes that an imbalance between risk and protective factors in the home can influence whether a child is susceptible to drug abuse. Risk factors within the home include a chaotic home environment, lack of a significant relationship with a caring adult, and a caregiver who abuses substances, suffers from mental illness or engages in criminal behavior. Factors outside of the home, such as availability of alcohol and drugs, and social acceptability of risky behavior also impact a child’s susceptibility to using illegal substances. Protective factors include a strong family bond, parent involvement, and clear limits and consistent enforcement of discipline.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/preventingdruguse_2.pdf

Similarly, the National Crime Prevention Council, in “How Parents Can Prevent Drug Abuse” lists six tips for parents, all of which involve parental involvement, clear communication, consistent rules, positive role modeling, and talking about the issue.

http://www.ncpc.org/topics/drug-abuse/alcohol-tobacco-and-other-drugs

Strong parenting is key in helping our kids avoid drug and alcohol use. Here are three steps toward helping your child to say no to drugs:

·      Talk to Your Child. Drugs is not a topic to avoid. Any discomfort will soon be replaced with relief that you’ve opened the conversation.

·     Get Involved. Spend time with your child every day doing what he/she wants to do, not what you want

·     Live the Life You Want Your Child to Live. Set a good example and, with luck, your child will follow it.

Parenting is hard. Being a parent to a child on drugs is harder. Talk to your child today.

Kym Laube is the program director of SAFE in Sag Harbor, a community-based organization dedicated to creating a substance-abuse-free environment in Sag Harbor, safeinsagharbor.org

Monthly Meeting Dates

Plan ahead to attend the monthly SAFE in Sag Harbor meetings. Mark your calendar today!

March 29

*April 19

May 17

June 21

July 19

August 16

September 20

October 25

November 22

December 20                                                                                                                                                    

All meetings will begin at 6 p.m. in the Pierson Library, except where noted (*room 1170). 

Meetings are open to the public.